Cathy and Bill Vitucci are first generation farmers in Wellandport. Bill’s grandparents always farmed, and he enjoyed spending time there growing up. He started in the mid-90’s with some land and a small beef herd while working in the ag industry but always knew that he wanted to farm fulltime. Cathy’s great grandfather farmed in Smithville, and Cathy grew up on that 100 acre patch of land, but her father and grandfather were carpenters. She was a dental assistant for 15 years and growing up on the edge of town, saw herself as more of a city girl. Cathy met Bill in 1998 and grew into the farming life. Together they took a leap of faith, buying their first property together in 2000, getting married soon after and buying four more farms in a very short time. Now, Vitucci Farms is a mid-sized grains and oilseeds family farm, with a farm-based Pride Seeds dealership.

Cathy and Bill Vitucci are first generation farmers in Wellandport. Bill’s grandparents always farmed, and he enjoyed spending time there growing up. He started in the mid-90’s with some land and a small beef herd while working in the ag industry but always knew that he wanted to farm fulltime. Cathy’s great grandfather farmed in Smithville, and Cathy grew up on that 100 acre patch of land, but her father and grandfather were carpenters. She was a dental assistant for 15 years and growing up on the edge of town, saw herself as more of a city girl. Cathy met Bill in 1998 and grew into the farming life. Together they took a leap of faith, buying their first property together in 2000, getting married soon after and buying four more farms in a very short time. Now, Vitucci Farms is a mid-sized grains and oilseeds family farm, with a farm-based Pride Seeds dealership.

Hello everyone Welcome to the new digital platform! Hopefully everyone in our region is healthy and coping with the “new normal” of the pandemic. Unfortunately like most events in our lives, most of the meetings and summer events are on pause for the foreseeable future. Here’s hoping we will be able to resume our local meetings this winter. After last years’ rain-filled spring, we were due for the nice planting weather this year. As of early June, most of the crops in our region look excellent, though it is slowly getting dry.

I think 2019 geared us up for the challenges in 2020, cause 2020 certainly hasn’t been easy! So many up’s & down’s; snow in May and 31o C a week later, frost on hay mid June. It doesn’t always cause damage but it takes some time for things to smarten up from that. People in parts of the region are just finishing up planting while others were done a few weeks ago. There’s a lot of variability across the region due to soil type and weather, but most areas are in need of rain.

Nutrient management consultants are an invaluable resource for farmers needing a nutrient management plan when they’re looking to expand or build new livestock facilities. But their services and advice can also make a difference where construction isn’t at play, from helping lower fertilizer costs to reduced paperwork and understanding manure storage and application options. For Gary Van Ankum, a nutrient management consultant with Clean Field Services in Drayton, figuring out how much manure to apply, when and where is one of the most important tasks in nutrient management, and although there is a free online tool available for farmers to do this work themselves, it can be a daunting task.

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